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What is the process by which the kernel launches an executable binary file on a Linux system?

asked 2022-08-26 11:00:00 +0000

scrum gravatar image

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answered 2021-04-30 21:00:00 +0000

david gravatar image

The process by which the kernel launches an executable binary file on a Linux system goes through several stages:

  1. The kernel loads the binary file from disk into memory, allocating memory space for the program.

  2. The kernel reads the executable file's header to determine the program entry point, load address, program header and section header information.

  3. The kernel maps the executable code into memory using the virtual memory subsystem, where it can be executed as its own process.

  4. The kernel sets up the initial process state including program arguments, environment variables, and other resources required by the program.

  5. The kernel starts the program by jumping to the entry point specified in the program header.

  6. The program begins executing and can make system calls to interact with the kernel and other processes on the system.

  7. The kernel monitors the program and handles any signals or exceptions that occur during execution.

  8. When the program terminates, the kernel releases the memory space allocated to the program and marks the process as terminated in the process table.

Overall, the kernel is responsible for managing the resources required to execute the program and provides a secure execution environment for the program to run in.

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Asked: 2022-08-26 11:00:00 +0000

Seen: 12 times

Last updated: Apr 30 '21